Banjo-Kazooie Spiritual Successor Raises $1.5 Million in 24 Hours

The Kickstarter campaign for the Banjo-Kazooie successor called Yooka-Laylee from a team of former Rare developers went live yesterday and quickly hit its funding goal of £175,000. A day later, the Kickstarter campaign crushed that initial target, raising a whopping, £1 million, or roughly $1.5 million.

“Obviously we would like to offer our sincere thanks to everyone who has backed the project so far,” Playtonic Games said in a Kickstarter update. “Our intention from the beginning was to use Kickstarter as a means to improve Yooka-Laylee, and you’ve helped us shape it into one fine specimen.”

Playtonic says the additional funds will allow it to release the game on PC, Mac, Linux, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Wii U simultaneously.

Since it reached all of its initially stated stretch goals, Playtonic added two new ones. If funding reaches £1.1 million, Playtonic will add an old-school N64 shader mode and a credits GK Rap video written by Grant Kirkhope. If it hits £1.2 million, Playtonic will produce a developer walkthrough and commentary Let’s Play video.

You can secure a copy of Yooka-Laylee by pledging at least $15. Backing at that level gets you a copy of the PC version, while you’ll need to pay around $22 to get a console copy.

Banjo-Kazooie Spiritual Successor Raises $1.5 Million in 24 Hours

The Kickstarter campaign for the Banjo-Kazooie successor called Yooka-Laylee from a team of former Rare developers went live yesterday and quickly hit its funding goal of £175,000. A day later, the Kickstarter campaign crushed that initial target, raising a whopping, £1 million, or roughly $1.5 million.

“Obviously we would like to offer our sincere thanks to everyone who has backed the project so far,” Playtonic Games said in a Kickstarter update. “Our intention from the beginning was to use Kickstarter as a means to improve Yooka-Laylee, and you’ve helped us shape it into one fine specimen.”

Playtonic says the additional funds will allow it to release the game on PC, Mac, Linux, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Wii U simultaneously.

Since it reached all of its initially stated stretch goals, Playtonic added two new ones. If funding reaches £1.1 million, Playtonic will add an old-school N64 shader mode and a credits GK Rap video written by Grant Kirkhope. If it hits £1.2 million, Playtonic will produce a developer walkthrough and commentary Let’s Play video.

You can secure a copy of Yooka-Laylee by pledging at least $15. Backing at that level gets you a copy of the PC version, while you’ll need to pay around $22 to get a console copy.

The Last of Us Fan Cinematic Cut Gives You Just the Story

The Last of Us has great characters and story, but not everyone is good enough at video games to get through its stealth combat gameplay. Thanks to YouTube user Grant Voegtle, now anyone can enjoy the game’s story, even if they don’t like playing video games.

Voegtle has been working over the last month to create an episodic, cinematic playthrough of The Last of Us, cutting captured gameplay footage to focus on the important story beats, and the result is something akin to a television show.

“I was hearing that people wanted to share the story of The Last of Us with their family, but they just didn’t have the time to have them sit down and play the entire game,” Voegtle told The Verge in an interview. “Hearing that and knowing that I could do that for people—that’s been the most motivating thing so far to keep me working on it.”

You can watch trailer for the cinematic playthrough above, and catch up with the entire series of videos on Voegtle’s YouTube channel.

In other The Last of Us news, Sony and Naughty Dog on Friday announced that the single-player expansion for The Last of Us, called Left Behind, will be released as a standalone download on PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4 this month.

The Last of Us Fan Cinematic Cut Gives You Just the Story

The Last of Us has great characters and story, but not everyone is good enough at video games to get through its stealth combat gameplay. Thanks to YouTube user Grant Voegtle, now anyone can enjoy the game’s story, even if they don’t like playing video games.

Voegtle has been working over the last month to create an episodic, cinematic playthrough of The Last of Us, cutting captured gameplay footage to focus on the important story beats, and the result is something akin to a television show.

“I was hearing that people wanted to share the story of The Last of Us with their family, but they just didn’t have the time to have them sit down and play the entire game,” Voegtle told The Verge in an interview. “Hearing that and knowing that I could do that for people—that’s been the most motivating thing so far to keep me working on it.”

You can watch trailer for the cinematic playthrough above, and catch up with the entire series of videos on Voegtle’s YouTube channel.

In other The Last of Us news, Sony and Naughty Dog on Friday announced that the single-player expansion for The Last of Us, called Left Behind, will be released as a standalone download on PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4 this month.

Watch GTA 5’s Top Mods Take Cows to the Strip Club and More

The Grand Theft Auto V modding scene on PC is still in its infancy, but there are already a few good tools out there that will let you modify the game in some interesting ways.

GameSpot’s Robert Handlery and Mary Kish took the top GTA V mods for a test drive, and as you can see in the video below, the results are hilarious.

If you want to know how to spawn whales from the sky, recruit a crew of bodyguards, start a riot, or go back to North Yankton, these are the mods being used in the video:

Unfortunately, you may have trouble installing these mods now. According to members of the modding community, the last patch rendered Script Hook V, a tool used for GTA V mods, unusable. This is forcing those who wish to continue using mods to revert to older versions of the patch, which you can only do if you’ve made backups ahead of time or are willing to download older files online from unofficial sources.

Watch GTA 5’s Top Mods Take Cows to the Strip Club and More

The Grand Theft Auto V modding scene on PC is still in its infancy, but there are already a few good tools out there that will let you modify the game in some interesting ways.

GameSpot’s Robert Handlery and Mary Kish took the top GTA V mods for a test drive, and as you can see in the video below, the results are hilarious.

If you want to know how to spawn whales from the sky, recruit a crew of bodyguards, start a riot, or go back to North Yankton, these are the mods being used in the video:

Unfortunately, you may have trouble installing these mods now. According to members of the modding community, the last patch rendered Script Hook V, a tool used for GTA V mods, unusable. This is forcing those who wish to continue using mods to revert to older versions of the patch, which you can only do if you’ve made backups ahead of time or are willing to download older files online from unofficial sources.

Dota 2 Compendium Raises $4 Million Prize Pool Overnight

Valve has released the 2015 Compendium to its annual Dota 2 tournament The International last night, and proceeds from its sales have already raised the championship’s overall prize pool to more than $4 million.

First introduced in 2013, the Compendium is a digital interactive program for the competition, where you can keep track of the different teams and make predictions. Each Compendium costs $10, and each sale raises the prize pool by $2.50. As the prize pool grows and hits its stretch goals, more rewards unlock for all Compendium owners and, in some cases, all players. When the Compendium hits $4.5 million, for example, Valve will add new loading screens to the game.

Leveling up your Compendium by using it and completing special challenges will reward you with Battle Point and different items. You can also just buy points to level up, and 25 percent of those sales will also add to the overall prize pool.

Last year, the Compendium helped drive the total prize pool to over $10 million, making it the largest purse for any eSports event in history.

Valve sold tickets to the 2015 International in two waves of 10,000 tickets in late March, both of which sold out in less than 10 minutes.

This year’s International takes place August 3-8 at KeyArena in Seattle, WA, the city that’s hosted the last three tournaments.

Dota 2 Compendium Raises $4 Million Prize Pool Overnight

Valve has released the 2015 Compendium to its annual Dota 2 tournament The International last night, and proceeds from its sales have already raised the championship’s overall prize pool to more than $4 million.

First introduced in 2013, the Compendium is a digital interactive program for the competition, where you can keep track of the different teams and make predictions. Each Compendium costs $10, and each sale raises the prize pool by $2.50. As the prize pool grows and hits its stretch goals, more rewards unlock for all Compendium owners and, in some cases, all players. When the Compendium hits $4.5 million, for example, Valve will add new loading screens to the game.

Leveling up your Compendium by using it and completing special challenges will reward you with Battle Point and different items. You can also just buy points to level up, and 25 percent of those sales will also add to the overall prize pool.

Last year, the Compendium helped drive the total prize pool to over $10 million, making it the largest purse for any eSports event in history.

Valve sold tickets to the 2015 International in two waves of 10,000 tickets in late March, both of which sold out in less than 10 minutes.

This year’s International takes place August 3-8 at KeyArena in Seattle, WA, the city that’s hosted the last three tournaments.

Twitter Kills Ability to Embed Wolfenstein, Other MS-DOS Games in Tweets

Earlier this week, we found out that that you could embed entire MS-DOS games preserved on the Internet Archive in tweets, but yesterday Twitter killed the feature.

The tweet below, which we included in our early story about being able to play MS-DOS games directly through Twitter, originally allowed you to play Wolfenstein 3D without leaving the page. As you can see, it is now just a link that takes you to Internet Archive, where you can still play the game.

It seems that the feature violated Twitter’s rules around Play Cards, which allow users to embed audio and video clips. According to Twitter’s site, “Player Cards are reserved for linear audio and video consumption only.”

Twitter specifically asks developers to “not build end-to-end interactive experiences inside the video or audio player unrelated to Player Card content, such as the following: purchasing, gaming, polling, messaging, and data entry.”

Unfortunate, but don’t let this prevent you from checking out the Internet Archive’s amazing collection of free MS-DOS games. There are 2,604 games available as of this writing, and many of them are classics: SimCity, Wolfenstein 3D, Prince of Persia, The Oregon Trail, Leisure Suit Larry, and Jazz Jackrabbit.

Twitter Kills Ability to Embed Wolfenstein, Other MS-DOS Games in Tweets

Earlier this week, we found out that that you could embed entire MS-DOS games preserved on the Internet Archive in tweets, but yesterday Twitter killed the feature.

The tweet below, which we included in our early story about being able to play MS-DOS games directly through Twitter, originally allowed you to play Wolfenstein 3D without leaving the page. As you can see, it is now just a link that takes you to Internet Archive, where you can still play the game.

It seems that the feature violated Twitter’s rules around Play Cards, which allow users to embed audio and video clips. According to Twitter’s site, “Player Cards are reserved for linear audio and video consumption only.”

Twitter specifically asks developers to “not build end-to-end interactive experiences inside the video or audio player unrelated to Player Card content, such as the following: purchasing, gaming, polling, messaging, and data entry.”

Unfortunate, but don’t let this prevent you from checking out the Internet Archive’s amazing collection of free MS-DOS games. There are 2,604 games available as of this writing, and many of them are classics: SimCity, Wolfenstein 3D, Prince of Persia, The Oregon Trail, Leisure Suit Larry, and Jazz Jackrabbit.